Well, the board is either fixed, or it's going to run terribly. Cross your fingers and hope for the best. I'm at my technical limit right now.

Buttstock repair / How to put the toe back on your stock -Images Missing-

Post Reply
Message
Author
User avatar
Zeliard
Member
Member
Posts: 170
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 10:27 pm
Age: 40
Location: Southeast US
United States of America

Buttstock repair / How to put the toe back on your stock -Images Missing-

#1 Post by Zeliard » Mon Sep 11, 2017 2:23 pm

Original authors in bold.

Note: One missing image in italics (Mauser_Buttstockrepair10.jpg).

Note: Superfluous comments removed.

Candyman

Hello everyone, In this repair I will show you how to put the toe back on your buttstock. For those that don't know what the toe is, it is the bottom side of the buttstock. The top of the buttstock is sometimes called the heel.

The victim for this repair is a Mauser stock that belongs to CalFed and the damage is the courtesy of the guys that drive The Big Brown Trucks #-o
Well here is the victim;

Image

As you can see it is a clean break which will make it easier to repair. There is a very small chip of wood missing at the very tip of the break. The chip is very small and I will just fill it with fiberglass resin. You can also see that the crack goes right through the lower buttstock screw hole. I'll show you a little trick to save the hole so that you will not have to re drill it when you finish the repair. I will also do my best to save the finish on the stock. The
Patina and color of the stock is so nice that it would be a shame to have to refinish it.

Image

The first thing you will need to do is make sure that everything lines up and how you will clamp the repair for a tight fit.
To save the screw hole just fill both sides with paste wax but, not too much or it will get into the crack and you don't want paste wax in your crack. :wink:

To help save the finish on the stock, put a coat of wax on the outside of the stock so that any overflow resin does not stick to it. Just be careful not to get any wax on the crack line. Just don't put any wax within 1/8 of an inch of the crack line.

Image

Mix up some fiberglass resin and put a thin coat on each side. Now don't go and put on too much because you will just end up with a mess to clean up later.

Image

Once you have the resin on the parts, put them together and put your clamp on. As you can see I am not using a reg. clamp. What I have is two pieces of wax coated cord. The cord is wrapped in an over lapping wrap so that it will stay in place. If you do use a wax coated cord, first try it out before you put the resin on, to see if it will hold.

Image

As you can see some of the resin is oozing out. Use a paper towel to wipe off any large amounts that oozes but, don't wipe too much because you don't want to remove the wax from the outside of the stock.

Image

Once you have everything clamped and set, just set it aside to dry and find something to keep you busy for about an hour or two.

Image

Once the resin has dried, remove the clamps or cord and see what kind of mess you have to clean up.

Image

Most of the resin on the outside of the stock should just peel off but, what is along the crack line will have to be cleaned up with a file. Take your time with the file and try to do as little damage to the finish as possible.

Image

Image Missing

After clean up check your work. If you look close you can see where the crack line is. I was not happy with how much the crack line was showing so I had to fix it

Image

Image

Image

Image

To dress up the crack line I mixed up a little more resin and put it along the crack line and let it dry.

Image

Image

After it dried I used my file to dress it up. Now doesn't that look much better? Remember, everything you do or don't do, will show in the end.

Image

Image

In these last two pic's you will see what I used to blend the finish. Blending the finish is a really big part of the repair. If you blend it right you will find that it will help to hide your repair .

Image

Image

With a little use and handling, the finish will blend to where it will hardly be noticed that the repair was done.
I hope that this repair helps some of you and shows it is not that hard to work with fiberglass resin.
And as always, if you have any questions, please feel free to ask and all comments are welcome.

Candyman
c141b wrote:
Why did you not drill holes in the stock and put dowels in them?
No dowels were needed. The resin bonds the area stronger then before it broke. When the toe is completely broken off and is a clean break you are able to cover the entire surface with resin and dowels really aren't needed as it's not a high stress area. I guarantee this repair as I do like all my repairs, which is for as long as I'm alive and I don't plan on leaving anytime soon. :lol:

A clean break is much easier to hide then one that has been crushed or a cut and splice.
If you look really close, just behind the swivel, you will see where I had to fill a small spot where a chip of wood was missing.
This type of work is really not all that hard but it does take time to learn all of the little tricks that will make your work look great. I try to pass on some of these little tricks with each repair post I do.

Byrd

Great post & good work! How about a question? I have a M44 Mosin that the toe is missing on. Could you give me any tips as to how to repair & match it? It is a refurb that is in great shape & I got is somewhere for $40 & would like to restore it instead of putting it in an AT stock.

Candyman

To replace a missing toe, large or small, is not all that hard but, the bigger the missing piece the harder it will be. The hard part is shaping the bew area to the correct shape.

First you need to cut the stock flat where the piece is missing. Next is to get a piece of wood of the same type and as close to the same color. I like to cut the new piece a little bigger then it needs to be and shape it with a hand file but, a belt sander can be used also.
I use Acraglas to attach the new toe on and shape it. If you want it a little stronger, you can drill, at an angle into the butt from the stock into the new toe and glass a dowel into it. The buttplate will cover the dowel and It will not be seen unless you remove the buttplate.
I have a M44 stock that needs a toe put back on it but, I haven't had the time to work on it.

Byrd

Thank you Candyman for the tips on how to replace my "missing toe" That doesn't sound like too difficult a job, just finding the right wood & the final finish. It sounds like I will probably have to finish the entire stock to get the match right.

Candyman

For the wood you would most likely need a piece of Brich. When a large repair is done, most of the time it is best to refinish. But sometimes you can get it to match pretty close and Shellac is a very forgiving finish to work with.

Preachere

Since quite a lot of Mosins have replaced toes it wouldn't be "improper" if your repair didn't match up perfectly. Others wouldn't think twice if they saw two types of wood in that area, it is so common.

Candyman
Maximum Armor wrote:
I got a buttstock repair challenge,i have this Canadain marked NO1 MK3 buttstock that i have been holding on to for some time because you don't see them every day & i liked the grain in the walnut on this one but anyway when i got it what someone did was shave off the end so it was flat for a recoil pad, :roll: Is there any way of repairing it so a guy can put a brass butt plate back on it like it should be?[No pics right now]
The only easy way to repair it would be to cut the end off another stock and splice it on. It would be a lot of work to splice on just an extra piece and inlet it for the butt plate. The cost of cutting it for the butt plate would be more then what the stock is worth.
Proud alumni of Transylvanian Polygnostic University. "Know enough to be afraid."

"Vertroue in God en die Mauser".-Faith in God and the Mauser.

"Send lawyers, guns and money." -Warren Zevon

Post Reply

Return to “Stock Care and Replacement Stocks”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests