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A Pure Tung Oil Blond Magnum/Pure Tung Oil Finish

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Zeliard
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A Pure Tung Oil Blond Magnum/Pure Tung Oil Finish

#1 Post by Zeliard » Thu Sep 07, 2017 11:25 pm

Original authors in bold.

Note: Superfluous posts removed.

Candyman

I picked this stock up, along with a few other for $5 each a while back.

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As you could see it was a very clean stock with on dings or dents so why mess with it.

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Well, I thought ya'll would like to see what Pure Tung Oil looked like on an unstained stock and I have a Marlin 882SS 22 magnum rifle in a black stock that I thought would look nice as a blond.

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When you look at a stock, don't look at what it is but, what it could be.
Here it is after it was stripped.

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Here is what I used for sanding. I started with 150 grit then finished with 220 grit. I could have sanded with 300 or 400 grit but I didn't want the stock to be that smooth. Remember to always use a sanding block when sanding. Wood has hard and soft spots and the darker grain lines tens to be the harder part of the wood. If you sand with just your hand you could end up with ripples in your stock, due to the uneven pressure. This stock will only get a light sanding to smooth it.

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When sanding use even pressure but not too much pressure. You could leave deep scratches that you will have to sand out.

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When you sand a stock you must be very careful not to round off the edges and if the buttplate is plastic, leave it on when sanding. If the buttplate is metal, use masking tape to cover it.

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After the sanding was done I started the oil finish using Pure Tung Oil. Now don't get this mixed up with Tung Oil Finish, which is not an oil but, a thin varnish with little to no Tung Oil in it.

As you can see the oil is very light in color

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Here is the next master of the stock work. This is Isaac, he's 4 years old and just love to help with the stock work. He helps out with all of my oil finishes.

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The first coat of oil was rubbed in by hand and allowed to stand on the stock for 30 min. then wiped off and allowed to dry for 24 hours. The next coat was done with an oil scrub, wiped off and allowed to dry for 24 hours.
The next 2 coats where put on very thin and allowed to dry. the last coat was allowed to dry for 48 hours, then a clear paste wax was put on it and buffed after it was dry.

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Here are the two stocks together.

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and here is the Magnum Blond. Now who ever said that Birch was not a good looking piece of wood.

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An oil finish is very easy to apply but it does take a little time to do it right.
I really love Pure Tung Oil. Over the next few years the color of the stock will not change much at all.
If you have any questions about applying Pure Tung Oil or any other oil please feel free to ask.


khunter

Hi Candyman,I have 8 coats of tung oil on my Mauser stock.It soaked up the first 7 and its starting to look like it's there.Is this normal to have so many coats?I have used BLO before and I never had to apply this many coats to seal the wood.

Candyman

1st, Are you using (PTO) Pure Tung Oil or, (TOF) Tung Oil Finish? PTO is a real oil and TOF is a thin varnish.

Every stock is different, the dryer the stock the more it will soak up the oil. Be sure to allow approx. 24 hours between coats and don't let oil dry on the surface of the stock. If it does not soak in within 30min. wipe it off.
Post some pic's of your stock.

Avoca

Question for Candyman - Could I get that color/shade on my yugo m48? Not sure if elm could get like that stock you have pictured above. It would be sweet if I could match that! Did you apply any toms 1/3 mix at all?

What does a varnish do like the TOF you mentioned earlier?

Candyman

It would be very hard to get a Yogu M48 stock as light as this one.
The Yugo stock is made of Elm and the Mariln stock is mad of Birch.
Birch will run from an almost white to a light brownish tan in color.
Elm runs from a light orangeish tan to a dark orangeish brown color, most often, somewhere in the middle.
The wood could be bleached but it may still ind up with a little orange in the color.
I wanted the Marlin stock to have some shine to it so I just used a paste wax. It's harder then Tom's Mix and buffs to a shine a little more.

CDFingers

Mine came out a tad darker, with pure Tung oil, three coats of it cut 50/50 with mineral spirits...

Candyman
Avoca wrote:
Thanks, Candy! What does varnish do? Tung oil?
A varnish is a surface cured finish. It dries on the surface to seal the wood. A weeping varnish is very thin and will soak into the wood some, but it has to be built up on the surface to protect the wood. Most varnishes are not that strong and will not stand up to use in the field. So when you see a bottle of Tung Oil Finish, you are really looking at a Varnish.
Pure Tung Oil (PTO) is an oil. It soaks into the wood and cures in the wood to protect it. It is applied the same as you would apply BLO but your drying time will be a little longer, due to it not having driers added to it like BLO.
Proud alumni of Transylvanian Polygnostic University. "Know enough to be afraid."

"Vertroue in God en die Mauser".-Faith in God and the Mauser.

"Send lawyers, guns and money." -Warren Zevon

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