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Renaissance Wax for protecting metal and wood

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pcj
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Renaissance Wax for protecting metal and wood

#1 Post by pcj » Sat Mar 31, 2018 9:52 pm

I have been using Renaissance Wax on my firearms , knifes ,etc . It provides very good protection and is used by Museum's to protect Arms , Armour , steel, copper , brass , furniture , Marble , wood and more . Developed by British Museum . Got mine from Brownells . It has given me good rust protection , really starting to like it .
Anyone else use it ?

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Re: Renaissance Wax for protecting metal and wood

#2 Post by 72 usmc » Sun Apr 01, 2018 12:03 am

It is a very fine wax that can be used on metals to stabilize the surface on more contemporary metal artifacts after they are cleaned. It does have a habit of collecting dust in outdoor exhibits and with artifacts in hot buildings that do not have climate controls. It can be used on wood.

I like H F Staples Carnauba wax both the clear and especially the antique orange/amber paste wax. This is good on marble and wood floors, and also furniture. It produces a hard coat that repels water. It goes on thin so you have protection, but does not produce a pimp shine to an old stock. However, put too much on and you turn a vintage stock into an altered piece of wood that looks like you polished a stock. That can remove the dry wood look and replace it with a waxed surface look like on furniture. Nice on some hunting rifles, but not a Mauser or old flintlock rifle. If you do not want a waxed look on an antique rifle then Kotton klenser wood feeder restores the wood surface, it gives the dry wood natural oils, yet avoids a wax surface like seen on new hunting rifles. For cleaning old clocks or furniture of years of built up grime, the " patina," Kotton Klenser cleaner actually removes some of the surface color & dirt. But it takes a skillful play at application & removal to maintain an even "patina." Like one is cleaning the years of grime off an oil painting, but its wood. I find the wood feeder is good for me. The KK cleaner works great on steps to remove wax build up and even out the wear patterns. Like Murphys oil soap, but a better product. The KK cleaner is just too strong for my taste on rifle stocks.

Renaissance wax is used on metal and it goes into the surface when applied hot & thin. It can be used on wood, but it is not as protective as a harder wax. There are better choices for wood artifacts. At our medieval fair the guys use it on the metal repro swords and armor. At the museum, we would use it on lumber camp metal artifacts and common iron tools and long saws. Tool collectors use it. When used on wood, go lightly and rub it in & off asap- almost like none was applied. It will restore the dry wood and deepen the color of the stock without producing a high sheen. I just find the Kotton Klenser wood feeder cream with natural wood oils works best for this. On metal it works better than heavy 30w oil because it attracts less dust than oil. Hanging a rifle on a wall or in a display case, I would use the wax on the metal. In a gun safe for long term storage or a basement, I use 30w or 40w car oil inside the bore and out side. Nothing like a nice coat of oil. GAA on the bolt and action. Sure you have to clean it prior to shooting, but I do not get rust.
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Re: Renaissance Wax for protecting metal and wood

#3 Post by DaleH » Sun Apr 01, 2018 9:32 pm

I "use" to use it, but heard about Tom's "1/3rd Mix" wax on these forums and I like it MUCH better!

FWIW my collectibles (originals) date from the late 1500s thru the US Civil War to WW2.

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Re: Renaissance Wax for protecting metal and wood

#4 Post by marysdad » Wed Apr 04, 2018 10:39 pm

I use it as well for my bayonets.
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Re: Renaissance Wax for protecting metal and wood

#5 Post by phideaux » Thu Apr 05, 2018 8:31 pm

Maybe I have led a sheltered life, and the fact that I'm just an old fart that don't adapt to change easily,
I have used Johnsons Paste wax (after a good cleaning of course) on all my guns for the past 30 years,
Metal and wood gets a good rubbed in coat , then buffed with a tee shirt , then handled only with a clean cotton sock to put it away,
I have never had ny oxidation appear on any gun....so I gotta be pushed hard to get me to do something different. :think: :)
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Re: Renaissance Wax for protecting metal and wood

#6 Post by marysdad » Thu Apr 05, 2018 11:36 pm

Johnson’s Paste Wax is fine. Any non-abrasive paste wax will do. When people ask me what to use, I tell them microcrystalline wax, hard furniture wax, or Johnson’s Paste Wax. Just NO automotive products.
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