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PostPosted: Mon Jan 09, 2017 2:56 pm 
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Mil-Surp Museum Curator
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Has anyone else ever collected something like this? I remember picking these up but have never tried them out. I guess I have an interesting weekend coming up and give these old pistols a try...
Pictured is my Frommer Stop, FN 1922, Beretta 1934...All in 32acp


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 09, 2017 4:35 pm 
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Nice trio. I've always enjoyed shooting .32/7,65mm pistols.

Let us know how they work out. I like to take multiple pistols of the same caliber to the range and see which ones shoot the best for me.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 09, 2017 6:02 pm 
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Mil-Surp Psychosis
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From what I've read about professional hits in Europe the favored weapon of European hitmen for many years was the FN 1922 in .32 ACP.
They liked it because they could swap out slides from a 1910 Browning leaving a good deal of exposed barrel at the muzzle to allow fitting a silencer.
I suppose they could also have obtained a spare 1922 barrel and fit it to a 1910 model.

In one of the Sean Connery James Bond films (Thunderball?) they couldn't find a Walther PPK with barrel threaded for a silencer, and Connery's PPK when shown has no such provision, so the substituted a FN modified as I mentioned already equipped. The pistol was on loan from a collector and unfortunately Connery cross threaded the barrel when he got careless putting on the silencer pretty much ruining the gun. The barrel threading for that particular pistol was very fine.

I have a 9mm Kurtz chambered Yugoslav FN 1922. The barrel wall of the 9mmK/380 ACP versions look to be far to thin for cutting proper threads.
If I were going to fit a silencer to the .380 version I'd obtain a spare barrel bushing/end cap and braze the Silencer end cap to the bushing. Leaving enough room inside before the first baffle to allow clearance for the barrel as the slide cycles. There would be less wear and tear on the barrel that way and the silencer would be quick detachable.

My brother had a WW2 bring back .25 ACP Mauser pocket pistol of the type built on a .32 sized frame. The muzzle of these protrudes a bit past the end of the slide and on his there were marks of an old style Maxim silencer having once been fitted and clamped down hard. The grips were the hand filling wrap around wooden grips normally seen on the .32 version. When he passed away the pistol went to his daughter.
I have to wonder just who (civilian or military) carried that pistol during the war years and what use they made of it.



BTW
I prefer to call these silencers when used with pistols or rifles firing subsonic cartridges. I've fired a few that actually eliminated all sound of the shot itself, only the mechanicals sound of firing pin strike and slide cycling being heard.
A silencer that effective normally requires an end wipe of some sort.
When supersonic ammunition is used then its a Suppressor since it can't eliminate the crack of the bullet breaking the sound barrier. It can only suppress the sound of the shot not eliminate it entirely.


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 10, 2017 8:58 am 
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FWIW, the Beretta mod. 1934 is .380 caliber. The mod. 1935 is .32 acp.

-Bob


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 10, 2017 11:27 am 
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SavageShooter wrote:
From what I've read about professional hits in Europe the favored weapon of European hitmen for many years was the FN 1922 in .32 ACP.
They liked it because they could swap out slides from a 1910 Browning leaving a good deal of exposed barrel at the muzzle to allow fitting a silencer.
I suppose they could also have obtained a spare 1922 barrel and fit it to a 1910 model.

In one of the Sean Connery James Bond films (Thunderball?) they couldn't find a Walther PPK with barrel threaded for a silencer, and Connery's PPK when shown has no such provision, so the substituted a FN modified as I mentioned already equipped. The pistol was on loan from a collector and unfortunately Connery cross threaded the barrel when he got careless putting on the silencer pretty much ruining the gun. The barrel threading for that particular pistol was very fine.

I have a 9mm Kurtz chambered Yugoslav FN 1922. The barrel wall of the 9mmK/380 ACP versions look to be far to thin for cutting proper threads.
If I were going to fit a silencer to the .380 version I'd obtain a spare barrel bushing/end cap and braze the Silencer end cap to the bushing. Leaving enough room inside before the first baffle to allow clearance for the barrel as the slide cycles. There would be less wear and tear on the barrel that way and the silencer would be quick detachable.

My brother had a WW2 bring back .25 ACP Mauser pocket pistol of the type built on a .32 sized frame. The muzzle of these protrudes a bit past the end of the slide and on his there were marks of an old style Maxim silencer having once been fitted and clamped down hard. The grips were the hand filling wrap around wooden grips normally seen on the .32 version. When he passed away the pistol went to his daughter.
I have to wonder just who (civilian or military) carried that pistol during the war years and what use they made of it.



BTW
I prefer to call these silencers when used with pistols or rifles firing subsonic cartridges. I've fired a few that actually eliminated all sound of the shot itself, only the mechanicals sound of firing pin strike and slide cycling being heard.
A silencer that effective normally requires an end wipe of some sort.
When supersonic ammunition is used then its a Suppressor since it can't eliminate the crack of the bullet breaking the sound barrier. It can only suppress the sound of the shot not eliminate it entirely.


Thats extremely interesting actually! I didnt know that at all about the slide switching. I think for feel and fit in the hand I am kind in between the FN and the beretta. The frommer is just the weirdest thing I have ever seen, but I want to see it in action. The barrel cycles in the frame...its the weirdest thing i have ever seen. You can see this on youtube.

RWS wrote:
FWIW, the Beretta mod. 1934 is .380 caliber. The mod. 1935 is .32 acp.

-Bob


I stand corrected! Its probably why my spare magazine didnt fit...even though it called out for it to be 32 acp. I need to find a spare...I think this one isnt original to the gun.


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 10, 2017 1:18 pm 
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Mil-Surp Psychosis
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I've been told that the FN1922 .32 magazine can be used in my .380 FN.
I suppose its due to the semi rim on the .32 case giving it a case head the same or close to the same dia as the .380.
Some have converted their FN1922 from one caliber to the other by simply changing barrels.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 11, 2017 9:44 pm 
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.32's are great, at one time I had several dozen different types, they were really beautifully crafted guns, especially the 10's to the 30's era..so many different kinds, each with their little nitch mechanisms for cocking/decocking etc...many were fixed barrels and most that I had were exceedingly accurate if you were ok seeing the sights.
My current favorite is not a pocket pistol but a VZ-61 skorpion, extremely accurate pistol and just looks bad-ass.....


Frank

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 12, 2017 11:09 am 
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burkefj wrote:
.32's are great, at one time I had several dozen different types, they were really beautifully crafted guns, especially the 10's to the 30's era..so many different kinds, each with their little nitch mechanisms for cocking/decocking etc...many were fixed barrels and most that I had were exceedingly accurate if you were ok seeing the sights.
My current favorite is not a pocket pistol but a VZ-61 skorpion, extremely accurate pistol and just looks bad-ass.....


Frank


Yeah I think they are pretty awesome. its like chilean or argentine mausers...they are amazing pieces of machined art...they work wonderfully. I think that this collection started with the frommer stop just because of how weird they are when they fire. Then of course...I needed to justify the need for the reloading components...so here is the Beretta 1935. Recently the FN was a definite "need" and bought it outright. HA HA. I have to try them out soon though, I dont like having safe queens.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 12, 2017 10:39 pm 
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Mil-Surp Psychosis
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When you shoot the FN1922 don't rely on the hook on the safety to hold the slide back for any reason.
Mine shows no obvious wear but if I engage the safety with slide held back it will hold the slide for about 30 seconds then release itself without warning.
If a loaded mag were in place it would chamber a round and if the stars were in the wrong alignment it might possibly slam fire.

A book on pocket pistols written by a forensic investigator told of cases where accidents with the Browning and FN striker fired autoloaders had been mistaken for suicides or murders. He didn't have much faith in the design after testifying in such cases.
Its not that its an inherently bad design, but it is prone to wear and tear.

One case was a real locked room mystery. A man was found shot twice in the head with his browning on the floor close by.
His Butler heard the shots and forced the door, and ended up being suspected of murder.
It turned out in test firing that this particular pistol was prone to slam firing and doubling. The death was either suicide or possibly accidental.


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