Well, the board is either fixed, or it's going to run terribly. Cross your fingers and hope for the best. I'm at my technical limit right now.

READY TO LAP

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OLDGUNNER
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READY TO LAP

#1 Post by OLDGUNNER » Mon Nov 20, 2017 4:03 pm

My lapping has been simplified. When the fire lapping craze started a few years I believed it - still do, very much...but do it differently. Now if I was to buy a 4 or 5 hundred custom barrel I would look close and could 'possible/probable' see where it could use at least a little lapping I bought the full line of Green Clover Lapping Compounds...rigged up the steel plates and did it. That black stuff made a mess. One time with that was enough for me, And...more important, to me was the idea of using Jacketed bullets...No more of that for me. It didn't really make sense to me at the time and still doesn't. I use plain soft lead only. The idea of 'long ride' bullets makes sense to me...why not. A few years ago Mid-South had a sales on LEE .22 Bullet Molds, 18 or 19 dollars. I know that LEE uses the cheapest, softest aluminum that he can find but it is easy to work with. I bought 6 of them just for Mold blanks. Well we know that LEE molds can resemble 'seconds'. I have nothing against LEE for this, I understand. He provides many of reloaders with an economical start into reloading that some may not otherwise be able to get started in. But these were definitely seconds and Mid-South should have said so. I have never seen a LEE Mold that I couldn't hold up the light and see through, but they are repairable...except for one thing, for me, I find that every one measures 1 to 1 and half thousands more in the mold gate direction. I try the LEE menting thing but it never works for me, and I think I know why, but I can lap the mold and the bullet is still out of round. It is just that 1 or so thousands larger in both diameters. I have had some Lyman molds that have had some really rough milling. I am convince that our poorly done lapping causes this out-of-roundness. But nothing like this was covered in my machinist classes. And I just don't have the experience of a machinist.
You know that I am DIY'er. I had lapped some on this .45 before but looking at it i'll do some more maybe this afternoon. I came across some Guitar polish at a yard sale...fine and medium grit Guitar Polish and so far I have been able to use it for everything. It is just regular Aluminum Oxide with a binder and I just add some paint thinner and... mop the bore and and shoot, one swipe cleaning...mop the bore and shoot. It takes longer than with Silicon Carbide grit but I am hard retired and if I don't do this my wife would find something else for me to do. I put maybe 50 rounds through this before but I'll put these pictured through it again. It is a very mild polish, the fine, maybe 5 micron. I have milder but it takes too long.
Notice my DIY loading block - just two by fours - have a bunch. I forgot when this 1917 was made but it still looks almost new.
For those with no experience in bore lapping...a big side effect is very minimum copper fouling and I get 'no' noticeable lead fouling.
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OLDGUNNER
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JUST A CLOSE-UP

#2 Post by OLDGUNNER » Mon Nov 20, 2017 4:32 pm

Just a close up of my mold making for Long-Ride lapping bullets.
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Rapidrob
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Re: READY TO LAP

#3 Post by Rapidrob » Mon Nov 20, 2017 7:20 pm

I started doing this in the 70's and the results have always been very good.
An older gunsmith I knew while on active duty, had one other trick in his sleeve. He would drill a hole at a 45 degree angle though the side of the bullet exiting in front of the base of the bullet. Far enough from the base to allow a strong side wall. The hole was only a 1/16". He would fill the void in the hole with the polishing compound.
As the bullet was fired the inertia and centrifugal force of the spinning bullet would deposit the polishing compound evenly within the bore of the firearm.
I tried this with a .38 Special Wad Gun and it worked very well. Low velocity and cast lead bullets.
Fire lapping using a jacketed bullet dose work but results are iffy.
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OLDGUNNER
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Fire Lapping

#4 Post by OLDGUNNER » Tue Nov 21, 2017 11:48 am

Well Rapidrob - As I said I used some jacketed bullets with my very first try. I only fired a couple and thought, hey, this is unduly hard on the sharp edges of the riflings, and have used only dead soft lead every since. I assume it may take more shots to get to the same place but....It seems that I have quite often thought differently on shooting things than some others. Quite often..??? I could make a long list. I read an article one time, "Beware of the man with only one gun'. Point being, he can be more familiar with where his bullet will go than others.
That's okay, except. One time I read an article that was about...A 30-06 being an idea caliber because one can reload with such a variety of uses, 110 grain bullet for varmints and 220 grain for Moose. I was young and since I had one 30-06 I would try this. I very soon learned that this did not work out for me. Again, point being, I would never know where my bullet would be going - not too easy to remember. So, with me, with a hunting gun I'll just use the same load that I have worked up and that is it. Now with others I'll experiment all over the place.
I think that this has something to do with my dad buying me my first gun, a .22 single shot just before my 6th birthday and we lived in the county. And...and, he said don't move that rear sight, and I think that was most important. I know that most military rifles have adjustable rear sights but that is for a different reason. That being, with most of the military this may be their first time at shooting and it is quicker to learn with the adjustable rear sight. With the person that is more familiar with shooting, this is not so. Now this is for quick off hand shooting and hunting. In war time it would be perfectly okay and proper for the Sergeant to say, "Everyone set your sights for 7 hundred yards and when I say so, empty your clip into that machine gun nest".
Anywho - I say fire lap that barrel, an easy way, and don't mess with of all that breaking-in ceremony, as if one particular routine is good for any barrel. Every barrel is created differently so why think that any one regimen will fit all. Don't just guess, look. They sell cheap Chinese but usable bore scopes for 12 dollars - I have two. When someone takes their gun to a gunsmith, yes it is more impressive to see him use that 500 Dollar Hawkeye bore scope. But the Hawkeye is much easier and quicker to use, I know. Now what can I do today? Maybe I'll go out get some 'Seep Willow' now that the sap is down.

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BORE LAPPING

#5 Post by OLDGUNNER » Tue Nov 21, 2017 2:05 pm

Let me add this on bore lapping. Typically barrel bores are machined and then lapped to help true them up and, etc. I just added this up... I got that Mossberg made 71,528 Model 44 US's .22's for the US government and most of these were sold for $14.65. Now machinist wages in 1943 was what, maybe 2.50 or 3 dollars and hour. Now think just how many hours were put into making each of these rifles and adding on the overhead and profit...they would have had to have made these in like maybe 2 and a half to 3 hours say, at the most. How much time do think that might have been put in on lapping the bores. In keeping with the new ‘politically correct’ wording, don’t you think that one would have to be ‘Mentally challenged’ to think that they devoted enough time to the lapping to do their best lapping job. One can say that it is this way with all firearms made. But still...some people will think that, ‘Oh no, we shan’t mess with that factory lapping – they know what they are doing’. One can see this all of the time. Well they do know what they are doing. It is lap only as good as necessary so it will work well enough to satisfy most of their customers. Why should ‘anyone’ think that any factory lapping job can’t be made better. ‘Everything’ about and on your firearm is a ‘COMPROMISE’...and all firearms. That can be scratched into your Butt Stock. If anyone disagrees with this I would like to hear their story – it won’t hurt my feelings.
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