Well, the board is either fixed, or it's going to run terribly. Cross your fingers and hope for the best. I'm at my technical limit right now.

Late War Carcanos

Post Reply
Message
Author
OldRifles
Junior Member
Junior Member
Posts: 29
Joined: Thu Dec 20, 2018 12:26 am
Age: 52
Location: California, USA
United States of America

Late War Carcanos

#1 Post by OldRifles » Sat Feb 23, 2019 2:54 am

Just curious, but does anyone else collect late war Carcanos?
I specifically collect German captured/modified rifles of other nations, and late war Carcanos are a natural fit for me. Does anyone else like the late war variations of Carcano rifles and carbines? Just curious, and would like to compare observations with other collectors, along with any info you've gained regarding continued Carcano production in northern Italy under either/or the RSI and German authorities.

Best,
Pat

M67
Member
Member
Posts: 257
Joined: Mon Jun 05, 2017 2:52 pm
Age: 51
Location: Slovenia, Europe
Slovenia

Re: Late War Carcanos

#2 Post by M67 » Sat Feb 23, 2019 5:54 am

I dont have late war Carcanos however I have this 1944 ammo box for 3x clip 6,5 x 52,
Attachments
Carcano Ammo box.jpg
»You're a disgrace. I'd like to know how you got to be a Captain, anyway. »Yossarian: »You promoted me.« Colonel Cathcart: » That has got nothing to do with it.«

OldRifles
Junior Member
Junior Member
Posts: 29
Joined: Thu Dec 20, 2018 12:26 am
Age: 52
Location: California, USA
United States of America

Re: Late War Carcanos

#3 Post by OldRifles » Sat Feb 23, 2019 5:49 pm

Nice! I've never seen a box that late over here (USA).

User avatar
Rapidrob
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 829
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 9:10 am
Age: 67
Location: New Mexico
United States of America

Re: Late War Carcanos

#4 Post by Rapidrob » Sat Feb 23, 2019 7:14 pm

I really like the 8x57mm Mauser carbines. I own several and they are great shooters at 200-500 meters. I had to make my own clips as they were issued as single-shot firearms.
Tin Can Sailor
'Nam Vet
NRA Endowment Member
President New Mexico Military Surplus Rifle Pistol Shooters

indy1919a4
Gun Nut
Gun Nut
Posts: 911
Joined: Sat Jun 10, 2017 12:23 pm
Age: 56
Location: Indianapolis, Indiana
United States of America

Re: Late War Carcanos

#5 Post by indy1919a4 » Sat Feb 23, 2019 7:29 pm

Rapidrob wrote:
Sat Feb 23, 2019 7:14 pm
I really like the 8x57mm Mauser carbines. I own several and they are great shooters at 200-500 meters. I had to make my own clips as they were issued as single-shot firearms.
So did those Carcanos originally have a wood filler in them??? Or they were single shot even with a clip

User avatar
Airforce1
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 141
Joined: Fri Jun 02, 2017 7:53 pm
Age: 33
Location: Faribault, MN
United States of America

Re: Late War Carcanos

#6 Post by Airforce1 » Sat Feb 23, 2019 8:03 pm

I have several late war ones in my collection as well including 3 that are German marked.

OldRifles
Junior Member
Junior Member
Posts: 29
Joined: Thu Dec 20, 2018 12:26 am
Age: 52
Location: California, USA
United States of America

Re: Late War Carcanos

#7 Post by OldRifles » Wed Mar 06, 2019 6:38 pm

I'm not sure why, but it appears that more of the later war production rifles and carbines are German depot stamped than the earlier examples. I've also never seen a Krieghoff conversion Carcano dated earlier than the late 1930s.

I also think that alot of late war production Carcanos were built FOR the Germans, not just under their supervision, but distribution was never realized due to Allied control of the air and the vulnerability of transport networks to bombing/interdiction.

Pat

User avatar
Rapidrob
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 829
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 9:10 am
Age: 67
Location: New Mexico
United States of America

Re: Late War Carcanos

#8 Post by Rapidrob » Thu Mar 07, 2019 11:32 pm

The 8mm Carcanos were five shot vs the standard 6 shot. That being said you can modify a six shot clip to hold five of the 8x57 cartridges but it is a sloppy hold.
As far as we as collectors know, there were never any "proper" five shot clips made for these little carbines and guards issued these carbines were told to use them as a hand loaded single shot firearm. My modified clips are 90% reliable for loading but they will not drop free of the magazine well after the last round is fired as they are just a few thousands of an inch too wide. A second loaded clip will push them out.
Since the barrel is so short, recoil is not a problem as the powder does not completely build up to max pressure . Some surplus ammo really throws out a fireball that is impressive.This little carbine would be hard to beat as a brush /deer firearm. The sights are dead on out to 300 meters.
Tin Can Sailor
'Nam Vet
NRA Endowment Member
President New Mexico Military Surplus Rifle Pistol Shooters

OldRifles
Junior Member
Junior Member
Posts: 29
Joined: Thu Dec 20, 2018 12:26 am
Age: 52
Location: California, USA
United States of America

Re: Late War Carcanos

#9 Post by OldRifles » Sun Mar 24, 2019 2:39 am

For those who want to read further-

Here is a post-war interview of a period German source with excellent, first-hand information on the status of late Italian small arms production under German control/supervision:

Generalmajor Doktor Ing Leyers. 'Die Kriegsproduktion Italiens nach dem .13 September 1943 (Italian War Production subsequent to 13 September 1943)'. Department of the Army, Office of the Chief of Military History (25 March, 1947), D-003. (In English)

BLUF: This is one of the many post-war studies done by the US War Department in the immediate post-war period for the purpose of extracting lessons for the future from WWII. This particular study illuminates the very interesting relationship between the German Wehrmacht and Italian industrialists and small arms producers following the Italian armistice with the Allies in September 1943. There is much to be learned here, especially the pre-war relationships between Italian industrialists and their German counterparts, many of whom gained Officers' commissions under the Third Reich and wound up working opposite the Italians to continue the production of war materiel in northern Italy for German military consumption.

Best,
Pat

Post Reply

Return to “Italian Rifles”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest